1914 Days of Hope



This Is An Account Of The First Few Months Of The Great War, From The Build Up Of The Fighting To The First Battle Of Ypres, Written By The Author Of Somme, They Called It Passchendaele And The Roses Of No Man S Land1914 Days of Hope

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the 1914 Days of Hope book, this is one of the most wanted Lyn Macdonald author readers around the world.

✅ 1914 Days of Hope  PDF / Epub ⚣ Author Lyn Macdonald – Tiffanydaniels.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 446 pages
  • 1914 Days of Hope
  • Lyn Macdonald
  • English
  • 17 June 2018
  • 0140116516

10 thoughts on “1914 Days of Hope

  1. says:

    If you are interested in the history of the BEF during the first three months of the Great War than 1914 is a good book for you Macdonald does a nice job of summarizing the events that led up to WWI and the actual deployment to France and Belgium but for me, the real fun starts with the first major action for the BEF at the battle of Mons The book follows the BEF from the defeat at Mons in August, to the furious rear guard action at Le Cateau, to the victory at the Marne, the Aisne and finally If you are interested in the history of the BEF during the first three months of the Great War than 1914 is a good book for you Macdonald does a nice job of summarizing the events that led up to WWI and the actual deployment to France and Belgium but for me, the real fun starts with the first major action for the BEF at the battle of Mons The book follows the BEF from the defeat at Mons in August, to the furious rear guard action at Le Cateau, to the victory at the Marne, the Aisne and finally, First Ypres in late November This is my second Lyn Macdonald book and she uses the same recipe that she used in They Called it Passchendaele She does a great job of framing and piecing together eye witness accounts so that the story flows and events can be followed and understood through the words of the participants Make no mistake that the main focus of this book is the BEF The French are only covered as their movements impact the BEF and are really big picture This book is for the anglophile or those that are interested in the history of the first three months of the war from the BEF s perspective If you are looking for a comprehensive understanding of events on the Western Front in the year 1914 than there has got to be a better book out there that could provide the French and German perspective Also, the personal accounts include many British period colloquialisms that were a little difficult to decipher at times There were a few lulls in this book but I really liked the coverage of the combat The battle of Mons on August 23rd was the first time the BEF engaged an enemy on the continent since Waterloo The first casualty inflicted by the BEF on the Germans was delivered by the slash of a sword by a dragoon on horseback who refused to sheathe his sword because he wanted his mates to see the blade adorned with the blood of the enemy This would be about the last time cavalry would fight on horseback In fact there is an eye witness account of a charge by German cavalry against infantry The German cavalry didn t get within 300 yards and all on horseback were slaughtered My favorite account was the elite BEF artillery battery that fought a decisive rearguard action at Le Cateau An order was misunderstood and the men thought they were to fight to the last The men interviewed said it was much like the Light Brigade at Balaclava Was there a man dismayed as the battery was destroyed There were several stories that demonstrate the fog of war in 1914 Communications were mostly by semaphore and there were plenty of units not getting the word to withdraw and were decimated One of my favorite stories was of the Northumberland Hussars paused to allow a French cavalry unit of Cuirassiers to pass by The Cuirassiers wore a funny looking helmet that was sure to become ceremonial by 1915 As the soldiers exchanged military courtesies, a British private soldier exclaimed out loud Wey, I thought them buggers war garman hoolans I wor firin at the likes o them all day yesterday I was a little disappointed that the book ends with the completion of First Ypres in late November I wanted to hear about the Christmas truce of December 1914 Anyway, by November the BEF had suffered 90% casualties It only took about 3 months for the BEF to be virtually destroyed in the first war to end all wars The Allies would win but someone else would have to do the fighting The professional army was history by November I am an American but I found the story of the BEF to be very interesting I plan to finish the series

  2. says:

    There, said Wellington, sitting in the park at Brussels two weeks before Waterloo, and answering Creevey s question about how well he hoped the coming campaign would go, it all depends upon that article whether we do the business or not He had seen a private soldier of one of the infantry regiments enter the park, gaping about at the statues Give me enough of it, he went on, and I am sureJohn Keegan The Mad Minute was a pre World War I term used by British Army riflemen during trainThere, said Wellington, sitting in the park at Brussels two weeks before Waterloo, and answering Creevey s question about how well he hoped the coming campaign would go, it all depends upon that article whether we do the business or not He had seen a private soldier of one of the infantry regiments enter the park, gaping about at the statues Give me enough of it, he went on, and I am sureJohn Keegan The Mad Minute was a pre World War I term used by British Army riflemen during training at the Hythe School of Musketry to describe scoring 15 hits onto a 12 round target at 300 yards 270 m within one minute using a bolt action rifle usually a Lee Enfield or Lee Metford rifle It was not uncommon during the First World War for riflemen to greatly exceed this score Many riflemen could average 30 shots while the record, set in 1914 by Sergeant Instructor Alfred Snoxall, was 38 hits During the Battle of Mons, in August 1914, there were numerous German accounts of coming up against what they believed was machine gun fire when in fact it was squads of riflemen firing at this rate. Wikipedia

  3. says:

    I read this just after Poilu , a first person account by a French corporal of his 4 year service in the French army This book is less personal, and perhaps errs a bit on the side of focussing on the men who survived, while 90% of their comrades were killed, wounded or captured None of the first person accounts excerpted here evidences much grief or horror at the huge casualties much is made deservingly of the British sacrifice to help hold off the Germans from overwhelming the allied force I read this just after Poilu , a first person account by a French corporal of his 4 year service in the French army This book is less personal, and perhaps errs a bit on the side of focussing on the men who survived, while 90% of their comrades were killed, wounded or captured None of the first person accounts excerpted here evidences much grief or horror at the huge casualties much is made deservingly of the British sacrifice to help hold off the Germans from overwhelming the allied forces There is a bit too much interest in the glory and not enough on the price That said, there is some very good writing and information here, I felt like I learned a lot

  4. says:

    Very good history of the first few months of the First World War, almost exclusively from the British perspective Macdonald includes scads of quotes from soldiers, from recollections and their diaries, to add a front line perspective that many histories lack You can feel the dread and frustration as the Brits back away after Mons, waiting for a chance to stand firm.The type on my edition is tiny and faint, which is frustrating, but maybe I m just old I also get tired of Macdonald s penchant f Very good history of the first few months of the First World War, almost exclusively from the British perspective Macdonald includes scads of quotes from soldiers, from recollections and their diaries, to add a front line perspective that many histories lack You can feel the dread and frustration as the Brits back away after Mons, waiting for a chance to stand firm.The type on my edition is tiny and faint, which is frustrating, but maybe I m just old I also get tired of Macdonald s penchant for Britishisms I have no idea what weighing sixteen stone is, and wonder if even your average Brit reader does But that s a minor issue with some wonderful writing.I do yearn fordetail, always a problem with military history I read something like the Germans advanced and we gave them what for and wonder what in the world that looked, smelled, sounded, or felt like Or what it even means Were they firing over a distance Was there hand to hand But that s a lot to ask for if you still want the overall strategic view, which this gives wonderfully There are some great sections about the artillery, and what it was like firing into masses of infantry while dodging machine guns and rifle shot by hiding behind a gun s shield, so you do get a feel for that, as well as what it was like for the cavalry and infantry stuck sleeping in fields overnight She builds suspense wonderfully, or maybe the war itself did that, because the book is awfully hard to put down once the two forces start to collide

  5. says:

    The first year of World War 1 as seen throught the eyes of British soldiers from all ranks Macdonald gives you a sense of the struggle of the British A good book though it would have beencomplete if she included the same information from the soldiers who were on the other side of the trenches as well.

  6. says:

    Macdonald did a great rendition to this momentous time in history Filled with detailed accounts from survivors of the war, a type of book to pick up from time to time.

  7. says:

    This book covers the fate of the British Expeditionary Force in 1914 which totaled about 100,000, consisting of professionals who were in the British Isles in August 1914 or reservists called up to fight These troops had been stationed throughout the empire and fought border wars in the northwest provinces of India, the Boer War, and in skirmishes throughout the vast lands controlled by the Empire.The force was sent to plug a gap as the French retreated from the long planned sycle movement by t This book covers the fate of the British Expeditionary Force in 1914 which totaled about 100,000, consisting of professionals who were in the British Isles in August 1914 or reservists called up to fight These troops had been stationed throughout the empire and fought border wars in the northwest provinces of India, the Boer War, and in skirmishes throughout the vast lands controlled by the Empire.The force was sent to plug a gap as the French retreated from the long planned sycle movement by the Germans that had been modified The BEF fought stoutly at Mons and we re driven back until the French counterattacked in the Battle of the Marne the BEF then raced to the sea to save the channel ports ending up in the first battle of Ypres The Germans were stopped and both armies dug in for trench warfare These brutal fights were holding actions where the BEF took massive casualties such that 90 per cent had been killed, captured, or wounded by the end of 1914 the Brits called for help from the Territorials and instituted mass conscription to take the place of the BEF Many tragic and wasteful battles lay ahead but the BEF had played its part to prevent the Germans from sweeping to victory before bloody stalemate sunk in The remnants of the BEF would be folded in to the replacement armies.The author fails to provide a description of how the French held up in the first five months or acomplete understanding of how the Germans missed their chance and what a narrow miss it was

  8. says:

    Lyn MacDonald s work on the British Army s phenomenal effort in the early days of WW1 against an army that was numerically much stronger Her use of soldiers letters and diaries adds colour to thestrategic narrative and gives the reader some idea of what it was like to be there Her end point was chilling that most of those Brits who started the war with such high hopes in August 2014 were dead by the end of the First Battle of Ypres the following November I finished the book almost 100 Lyn MacDonald s work on the British Army s phenomenal effort in the early days of WW1 against an army that was numerically much stronger Her use of soldiers letters and diaries adds colour to thestrategic narrative and gives the reader some idea of what it was like to be there Her end point was chilling that most of those Brits who started the war with such high hopes in August 2014 were dead by the end of the First Battle of Ypres the following November I finished the book almost 100 years to the day of the centenary of the Battle of Mons which seems fitting somehow

  9. says:

    Lyn Macdonald s research and writing is first class She blends the right amount of politics and strategy with extracts from diaries and interviews with soldiers and civilians who experienced WW1 Now that the last survivors of this war have passed on it makes her books all theprecious It is the very personal and human aspect of events that makes her books compelling reading These are not new books on the market but if you are interested in WW1 they are IMHO essential reading.

  10. says:

    A harrowing and heartbreaking book about the British Expeditionary Force s unending string of battles from August 1914 at Mons through the horror of First Ypres in November 1914 Much of the story told through personal diary entries or letters by soldiers and civilians I had no idea how close the allies came to losing the war at Ypres simply through attrition I recommend highly this book.

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