Wodwo



Amazing Book, Wodwo Author Ted Hughes This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book Wodwo , Essay By Ted Hughes Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For Please Read And Make A Refission For YouWodwo

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Wodwo book, this is one of the most wanted Ted Hughes author readers around the world.

[Ebook] ➠ Wodwo  By Ted Hughes – Tiffanydaniels.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • Wodwo
  • Ted Hughes
  • English
  • 10 September 2017
  • 0571097146

10 thoughts on “Wodwo

  1. says:

    In fairness, I didn t read the whole thing The version I read is contained within Collected Poems THAT book is over a thousand pages long In order for me to keep my thoughts together, I m thinking of it in terms of the various collections though there is a virtual gold mine of uncollected work in the BIG book Wodwo has a prose side to it, which was not included in the Collected Poems edition Evidently Hughes meant for the two to play off of each other Whatever I can say that the poems a In fairness, I didn t read the whole thing The version I read is contained within Collected Poems THAT book is over a thousand pages long In order for me to keep my thoughts together, I m thinking of it in terms of the various collections though there is a virtual gold mine of uncollected work in the BIG book Wodwo has a prose side to it, which was not included in the Collected Poems edition Evidently Hughes meant for the two to play off of each other Whatever I can say that the poems are really good According to my index, Wodwo is the 4th or 3rd collection by Hughes Prior to Wodwo, there was a collection called Recklings, which looks, due to its length, to be a chapbook of sorts It s also really good As I think I said elsewhere, in the long stretch of uncollected poems that came out after Luprecal 1960 , Hughes found for me at least , his voice His earlier collections have good poems, but as collections they seem uneven And cold There is precision, but no heart But sometime after 1960 Hughes seemed to discover or construct a personal mythology These would of course become the Crow poems, which can be pretty dark, but also darkly funny Crow, as a character, seems to me to be a lot like Loki, a trickster But there s muchgoing on in Wodwo which means wild man or troll in Middle English It comes from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight than this Crow character But what Crow does provide for Hughes is a mythological foundation for his poetry to operate from Interestingly, with Crow and his ties to Norse mythology , and Sir Gawain, Hughes, for all of his razor blade lines, shows himself to be a poet that was deeply traditional in his interests But as a poet of genius, he knew he had to make it new And he did Highly recommended for the poetry portion of the book.Here s a link from a bipolar discussion group to one poem, Ghost Crabs, that I really liked It reminds me, a great deal, of Plath s grim beach poems from The Colossus and Other Poems The influence between these two great poets, worked both ways The link is the best I could find The Hughes estate has his poetry on a tight leash.http www.dailystrength.org c Bipola

  2. says:

    Wodwo was Hughes second published poetry collection I d read all the poems before in Collected Poems and many are very familiar from many years of reading Hughes work What came as a surprise and made me buy this seperately is that the book comes in three parts some short stories and one play sandwiched by two sets of poems These aren t collected in Collected Poems and I had never even heard of Hughes writing prose fiction aimed at adults The stories and play are difficult in that they Wodwo was Hughes second published poetry collection I d read all the poems before in Collected Poems and many are very familiar from many years of reading Hughes work What came as a surprise and made me buy this seperately is that the book comes in three parts some short stories and one play sandwiched by two sets of poems These aren t collected in Collected Poems and I had never even heard of Hughes writing prose fiction aimed at adults The stories and play are difficult in that they are overtly symbolic andor less cryptic The connecting theme is transformation The first story, The Rain Horse easily my favourite has the protagonist menaced by a horse on open farm land he desperately flees the strangely behaving creature The play last of the prose works has a wounded soldier experiencing a surreal march toward the home lines to get treatment He is unable to escape his nightmare.From reading Selected Letters Ted Hughes it becomes clear that Hughes felt a psychological transformation occurring within him whilst writing the material for this book, so that the poems fell into two distinct tonal groups, representing before and after the change The prose works subconciously ended up representing the change itself The first shows Hughes struggling to reject the change, the last the inevitability, unavoidability of it.Whatever this transformation was, it is visible in the poetry Part 1 is tonally similar to Hawk in the Rain, Hughes first collection Part 3 is the first step down the road that would lead to Crow.I strongly recommend that Hughes fans who haven t already, get hold of this book and read it through linearly from beginning to end, bearing in mind the above comments

  3. says:

    This is a collection of poems, short stories, and one play It was weirdly wonderful Hughes use of words is beautiful and he paints beautiful word pictures I didn t always understand the themes or subject of the pieces, but overall, I was enchanted by his word wizardry.

  4. says:

    Ted Hughes is a poet whose work resonates very deeply with me I love the sensual wildness of his writing, the brutally cold eye with which he measures nature, and the ferocity that imbues his language, his imagery and rhymes Wodwo is a strange collection, but an important one It was published in 1967, his first collection since Sylvia Plath s suicide, and it s difficult not to read this tragedy into the lines Yet it s also hard other than in, maybe, a poem like Ballad From a Fairy Tale Ted Hughes is a poet whose work resonates very deeply with me I love the sensual wildness of his writing, the brutally cold eye with which he measures nature, and the ferocity that imbues his language, his imagery and rhymes Wodwo is a strange collection, but an important one It was published in 1967, his first collection since Sylvia Plath s suicide, and it s difficult not to read this tragedy into the lines Yet it s also hard other than in, maybe, a poem like Ballad From a Fairy Tale to actually pick out such references.What adds to the book s strangeness is the structure a section of poems a grouping of short stories and a radio play and a further section of poems to finish.The poems themselves are fully formed and crafted, and he offers some genuinely magnificent work, from the opening Thistles , through poems like the awesome Ghost Crabs , Out I, II and III , and Skylarks , to the stunning and thought provoking title poem finale.The prose section further muddies the waters The stories maybe suffer a bit in terms of pacing, and the poetic quality of the language can sometimes distract from the plot being unfurled, but The Rain Horse is beautiful and strange, ripe with Hughes natural appetites for the otherworldly, and Sunday , offers another sort of sweetness, a piece of childhood nostalgia And there is The Wound , a radio play that challenges with its fantastic narrative but finds, in its denouement, an unexpected and gut wrenching cohesion.So, there is an immense amount to like among these individual parts, but the bigger sense of the collection is murky and allusive Reading the book again, there s a rawness and typical obscurity that makes me wonder if the poet is working out thoughts, ideas and emotional shapes here, trying to make sense of a mind in wildest spin and feeling his way to something greater I think about a great artist, working on sketches that might precede adefined project, struggling to make sense of the challenge that awaits The painting to come might be the masterpiece, but there is often immense value also in the sketches And in the poems of Wodwo , there are distinct flavours not only of earlier poetry, but also of what will soon follow his major work, Crow

  5. says:

    One of my favorite poetry collections, though I was really only able to read it in small doses because I am a sensitive guy and the brutality and sensuality of these pieces did my nerves in Here are some notes I made, with favorite pieces, and lines Boom consumption as a way of mitigating inevitable death Cadenza contains the first of many allusions to floating coffins and makes me think that he was thinking about Plath and how he is like water, bearing the coffin that will not be sile One of my favorite poetry collections, though I was really only able to read it in small doses because I am a sensitive guy and the brutality and sensuality of these pieces did my nerves in Here are some notes I made, with favorite pieces, and lines Boom consumption as a way of mitigating inevitable death Cadenza contains the first of many allusions to floating coffins and makes me think that he was thinking about Plath and how he is like water, bearing the coffin that will not be silent, which may or may not be fact Ghost Crabs God s only toys is startingly sad and filled me with longing for my long unvisited birth town at the shore A Wind Flashes the Grass The trees too are afraid, they too are momentary, streams rivers of shadow Wino is one of the most sensual pieces I ve ever read Stations my favorite poem in the book Again, another allusion to the lifeboat coffin The Bear I love the way Hughes looks at animals, which are personified to an extent, but become forces of nature, almost godlke, less reflections of humanity The Wound This play caused me several panic attacks and I wouldn t recommend it to anyone dealing with mental instability or weak nerves It takes sensitivity to get on Hughes level, however a healthy distance to the material should be a required stamp on the cover as a warning label I don t know why people don t like this radio play or short stories so much poetry people being poetry people and not wanting to concentrate for 20 pages of dense prose perhaps The Rain Horse was also phenomenal You drive in a cirle Your hardest look cannot anchor out among these rocks Your coming days cannot anchor among these torn clouds that cannot anchor Pibroch was devastating and hopeless, most of these poems could be so described Does anyone see anything else in this work The Full Moon and Frieda Beautiful and not depressing or hopeless and a great way to end this collection

  6. says:

    My favourite Ted Hughes book, though like a lot of people I don t care for the prose sections Amazing vision the idea that the Viking peoples paid up front for their Calvinism and images that have never left my mind Crystal clear images terse, potent music, all with a very Northern spirit.

  7. says:

    Much, much too cryptic In the end, trying to decipher the meaning behind the dozen symbols crammed into one line of prose givesheadache than intrigue.

  8. says:

    Some well crafted poems e.g Thistle , and he succeeds best when he establishes an interesting metaphorical conceit that provides a good anchor basis for the poem e.g M Sartre Considers Current Affairs I love the image of the world being reconstructed inside a philosopher s mind as if it were spectre of a flower However, Hughes, for my tastes, is rather glib and rhetorical, and I feel this often works against the poems on several fronts For one, there is the perennial attempt which m Some well crafted poems e.g Thistle , and he succeeds best when he establishes an interesting metaphorical conceit that provides a good anchor basis for the poem e.g M Sartre Considers Current Affairs I love the image of the world being reconstructed inside a philosopher s mind as if it were spectre of a flower However, Hughes, for my tastes, is rather glib and rhetorical, and I feel this often works against the poems on several fronts For one, there is the perennial attempt which most poets are happily guilty of to create some sort of vivid intensity, but this is lost the moment Hughes cannot let go of the opportunity to indulge in some detail Maybe I m too used to Plath s poetry, but when she succeeds, her poems don t just feel intense they re not facsimile of a cauldron of emotions there is a givenness about them, as Seamus Heaney noted, they are like events in and of themselves Second, the attention detail always makes me feel like he s being somewhat patronising indulgent towards his subject matter The poem Skylarks comes to mind, with its somewhat fussy David Attenborough tone.In Crow, Hughes manages to weld these two issues together and they distill into a strength his Crow poems have a strange mythological fable like quality to them There are some attempts to do that here in Wodwo but it is too fragmentary to be satisfying I freely admit that there may be some poems which I ve failed to properly appreciate, and there maybe gems that I ve missed, but I think on the whole, my general feelings on the book will probably not alter very much upon re reading

  9. says:

    This is a mixture of poems and prose works The prose is not for me that interesting, but the poems include many of Ted Hughes best and most concentrated, written before he embarked on the comic book excesses of Crow or the self indulgence of Gaudete They show an intelligent control in which every word counts.

  10. says:

    Masculine poetry.Apparently not an oxymoron.I admit, I like his wife s stuff better, but this was quite emotionally full and lyrical.

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