Shadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9)



Introduction By George ZebrowskiForward By Isaac AsimovShadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9)

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Shadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9) book, this is one of the most wanted Chad Oliver author readers around the world.

[ KINDLE ] ❆ Shadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9)  Author Chad Oliver – Tiffanydaniels.co.uk
  • hardback
  • 207 pages
  • Shadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9)
  • Chad Oliver
  • English
  • 04 May 2018
  • 051755867X

10 thoughts on “Shadows in the Sun (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 9)

  1. says:

    Almost exactly like if the TV show Schitt s Creek was set in the 1950s and had a major plot twist.

  2. says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book for several reasons, some typical and some not so First, let me explain how I encountered this book This past weekend was Father s Day, and my wife s present to me was a trip to the Rare Editions section of our favorite Half Price Books store I found an inscribed edition of this book written by the professor I took Intro to Anthropology from back in the mid 70s at UT Austin and I couldn t pass it up I knew at the time he was an SF author but I have never read a I thoroughly enjoyed this book for several reasons, some typical and some not so First, let me explain how I encountered this book This past weekend was Father s Day, and my wife s present to me was a trip to the Rare Editions section of our favorite Half Price Books store I found an inscribed edition of this book written by the professor I took Intro to Anthropology from back in the mid 70s at UT Austin and I couldn t pass it up I knew at the time he was an SF author but I have never read any of his work until now Well, I am delighted to have finally remedied that unconscionable lapse But the story my story with this book is deeper than that Two years ago I started serious work on a novel about a man who discovers he may be part or wholly alien set in East Texas Finding this book, about an anthropologist who discovers that aliens, colonists, have taken over a West Texas town, is just too much of a coincidence Add to that the fact that Oliver published this book the year I was born Someone could easily read into the situation that my encountering this book at this time in my life goes beyond coincidence and flirts heavily with synchronicity.Okay, now for some review The story departs from the garish alien as superman, bug eyed monsters kind of science fiction that many people today think most 40s and 50s SF was like Later, the 60s and 70s would usher in a new wave of SFthoughtful and less stereotypical, less focused on UFOs and the awaiting disaster of nuclear Armageddon that so obsessed the SF culture of the 50s Shadows in the Sun is a precursor to that new wave in that it posits some serious, intelligent questions about the nature of humanity and takes anuanced approach to speculating about what first contact might be like Some reviewers have shied away from calling this book a classic Well, that may well be because it was ahead of its time Granted it s not on a par, perhaps, with More Than Human by Spurgeon, The Shrinking Man by Matheson, The Big Time by Leiber, anything from that era by Ray Bradbury or Robert Heinlein, or may others, but, shall we say, it is an important book, because it is the first or at least one of the first to tackle the thorny issues of humanity right here on Earth in a contemporary time and setting, and do so in a thought provoking and memorable way

  3. says:

    This is not your typical alien invasion story Don t look for suspense here Written by an anthropologist during the Cold War, this science fiction novel is a reflection on the nature of colonization The opening is amusing an anthropologist doing research on a small Texas town finds it a little too typical, then stumbles on a visit from the mother ship, learns the town is very civilized and not threatening, but still an alien colony Now as the savage, he has to decide to join up with the ad This is not your typical alien invasion story Don t look for suspense here Written by an anthropologist during the Cold War, this science fiction novel is a reflection on the nature of colonization The opening is amusing an anthropologist doing research on a small Texas town finds it a little too typical, then stumbles on a visit from the mother ship, learns the town is very civilized and not threatening, but still an alien colony Now as the savage, he has to decide to join up with the advanced civilization or not

  4. says:

    Man It s a great premise and wouldn t you just love to be in that situation Single, without commitments and invited by a superior race to join them Reap all the benefits Know all that you wish to study Deemed worthy I just disagree with the ending Certainly wouldn t have been my choice.

  5. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Shadows in the Sun is an odd little book The blurb on the back coupled with the cover art suggests the book is about an anthropologist, Paul Ellery, studying the relatively small Texan town of Jefferson Springs and gradually coming to the shocking realisation that every single one of the town s inhabitants is in fact an alien.The first couple of chapters support this hypothesis pretty well, since they introduce an anthropologist, Paul Ellery, who is studying the relatively small Texan town of J Shadows in the Sun is an odd little book The blurb on the back coupled with the cover art suggests the book is about an anthropologist, Paul Ellery, studying the relatively small Texan town of Jefferson Springs and gradually coming to the shocking realisation that every single one of the town s inhabitants is in fact an alien.The first couple of chapters support this hypothesis pretty well, since they introduce an anthropologist, Paul Ellery, who is studying the relatively small Texan town of Jefferson Springs and who has gradually come to the shocking realisation that every single one of the town s inhabitants is in fact an alien It reads like the book has started in media res, and I waited for quite a few of the book s scant pages for the flashbacks to start and to find out what aroused Paul Ellery s suspicions But the flashbacks never come, the book simply starts quite late in Paul s tale, a few hours before he gets the ultimate proof to confirm his hypothesis.The rest of the story is essentially built around the notion that the aliens who are in fact humans, with Chad Oliver trying to sell the unlikely notion that Earth like planets abound in the Milky Way, and on each one humans have evolved to be the dominant species are willing to let Paul become a member of their society, and him having to choose between a suddenly worthless existence on Earth or an overwhelming and inevitably never satisfactory life as a citizen of the Greater Galactic Commonwealth He agonises about the choice up until the final page at which point the author, having done a jolly good job of convincing the reader that neither choice is a good one, seems to have flipped a coin and picked one of the roads for his character with the vague suggestion that merely deciding one course over the other is sufficient for Paul s happiness I was about as convinced by that line of reasoning as I was by the story in general

  6. says:

    Oliver s odd little novella is far from being a classic, but it is certainlyoriginal than manyacclaimed sf stories Anthropologist Ellery finds the small Texas town of Jefferson Springs is not all it should be None of the residents have been there longer than 15 years, and all seem peculiarly ornery They go through the motions of being alive, until Ellery discovers they have quite another kind of life These are not invaders they are colonising aliens, and upon discovery they inv Oliver s odd little novella is far from being a classic, but it is certainlyoriginal than manyacclaimed sf stories Anthropologist Ellery finds the small Texas town of Jefferson Springs is not all it should be None of the residents have been there longer than 15 years, and all seem peculiarly ornery They go through the motions of being alive, until Ellery discovers they have quite another kind of life These are not invaders they are colonising aliens, and upon discovery they invite Ellery to join them in a sort of reverse colonising process This leads to a will he won t he climax in which the protagonist defers to the author, who imposes a cop out ending as a form of meta narrative Oliver s experience as an anthropologist is one of brooding pessimism, here disguised as getting the girl by not getting the galaxy

  7. says:

    I m a fan of older science fiction from the pulp classics to science fiction of the 50s 60s but I m no fan of this book I had to force myself to finish by skimming the second half of the book It was a snoozer The only interesting thing about reading it was to get an idea of rural life in Texas during the early 50s.

  8. says:

    Every science fiction author of the 1950 s wrote an alien invasion story This is one of the best.

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